Hearing Aids

Choosing an appropriate hearing aid depends on several factors, including the degree of your hearing loss, your personal lifestyle requirements, your preference, and your ear anatomy. It is a decision that is completely customized, and the process is guided by your personal preferences (ie. size, style, etc…) and budget. The Halton Hearing Centre will provide you with the most suitable hearing aid options!

Mini RITE (mini Receiver-In-The-Ear) Hearing Aids
    Pros:
  • Small, discreet & almost invisible
  • The most popular style of hearing aid
  • Comfortable to wear
  • Good battery life
  • Suitable for mild to profound hearing losses
  • Cons:
  • Good manual dexterity needed

IIC (Invisible-In-Canal) Hearing Aids

    Pros:
  • Smallest and most discreet hearing aid
  • Invisible as it fits very deeply in the ear canal
  • Easy telephone use
  • Reduced chance of feedback and occlusion (ie. plugged up feeling)
  • Suitable for mild and moderate hearing losses
  • Cons:
  • Good manual dexterity needed
  • Smallest battery and shorter battery life
  • May not be suitable for people with smaller ear canals

CIC (Completely-In-Canal) Hearing Aids

    Pros:
  • One of the smallest aids, fits deeply in the ear canal
  • Easy telephone use
  • Reduced chance of feedback
  • Suitable for mild to moderately-severe hearing losses
  • Cons:
  • Good manual dexterity needed
  • Smallest battery and shorter battery life
  • May not be suitable for people with smaller ear canals

RITE (Receiver-In-The-Ear) Hearing Aids

    Pros:
  • Not very visible
  • One of the most popular styles of hearing aid
  • Comfortable to wear
  • Good battery life
  • Suitable for mild to profound
  • Cons:
  • Good manual dexterity needed

BTE (Behind-The-Ear) Hearing Aids

    Pros:
  • Larger, easier to handle and insert
  • Larger battery and longer battery life
  • Durable and less prone to repairs
  • Suitable for mild to profound hearing losses
  • Suitable for people prone to infections, discharge and perforations of the tympanic membrane
  • Cons:
  • Hearing aid and earmold is more visible to others
  • May require periodic earmold tubing changes

CROS and Bi-CROS Units

    Pros:
  • CROS: Suitable if you are deaf in one ear, and have normal hearing in the “better” ear
  • Bi-CROS: Suitable if you are deaf in one ear, and have some hearing loss in your “better” ear (mild to profound)
  • Discreet in appearance
  • Larger battery, and improved technology allows for much longer battery life
  • Cons:
  • Good manual dexterity required
  • Shorter than average battery life due to constant wireless transmission between the devices

ITE (In-The-Ear) Hearing Aids

Pros:

  • Larger aid, easier to handle and insert
  • Good battery life
  • Suitable for mild to severe hearing losses

Cons:

  • More visible to others
  • May be more difficult to use with the telephone